Lion Brand Notebook

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What Motivates You When Selecting Yarn?

July 6th, 2009

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What is the main reason you choose a yarn:  color or texture?

  • TRACIE

    TEXTURE IS THE MAIN CHOICE. I HAVE TO LIKE THE FEEL. I LOVE ANYTHING SOFT AND FLOWING. I USED VANNA’S CHOICE FOR THE KAL PROJECT THIS WINTER; AND EVEN THOUGH IT TURNED OUT BEAUTIFUL AND WAS A JOY TO MAKE, IT IS FAR TO HEAVY AND ITCHY. I KNOW I WILL HARDLY WEAR IT. I MADE ANOTHER SWEATER FOR EASTER IN A MORE TEXTURED AND SOFTER YARN AND LOVE IT AND HAVE WORN IT OFTEN. I AGREE WITH ROSEMARY ABOVE, I WOULD RATHER MAKE FEWER PROJECTS BUT WITH WONDERFUL TEXTURE AND FEEL. I ALSO MAKE ALL BABY ITEMS IN ACRYLIC OR WASHABLE COTTON.

  • Karen

    Texture, color and price are all factors in my choice of what yarn I’ll work in. My daughter in law insists only natural fibers for my grandchildren….and since I am allergic to wool (at least I can handle the super wash kind now) most of the stuff I make for her children is in cotton.

    My daughter doesn’t worry so much about natural fibers, so her son gets washable and soft stuff.

    I didn’t do the knit along for the shrug because it would have looked horrible on my body type. I wish there were a knit along that would work better for us fuller figure gals. Shrugs that open up right at the belly area aren’t going to work for me.

    I find knitting very relaxing and enjoyable. I also crochet, make jewelry and paint. Knitting is by far, the easiest on my wrists.

    I also want to learn how to design my own patterns but I have had significant trouble getting the guage right on anything I try. I may get the stitch count down but then the vertical guage is off.

    Any tips, anyone?

  • BJ Strickland

    Like most of the posters above, color is what grabs me (or turns me off) first, then the feel of the yarn and whether it “calls” to me and says it has to go home with me.

  • Irene

    Color so sure since that will catch my eye from afar before I even get close to touch it!!!

  • Tori

    Texture! It doesn’t matter how much I love a color, if it doesn’t feel good I won’t buy it!

  • http://judytooley@gmail.com judy tooley

    What motivates me when I buy yarn? I will say
    the color and the feel as well as what I see.
    I will check out the yarn. If it bunches up
    when I knit it I will rip it out and crochet
    like I do Homespun a lot. To me Homespun is
    not meant to be knitted. I will take it and
    make granny squares. I fell in love with jiffy
    as soon as I picked up a skein as well as
    Moonlight mohair.
    judy tooley

  • http://snowdoggirlsthisnthat.blogspot.com Shelley Prior

    Color, color, color! I’m a slave to color – I’ll buy every color of anything if I like the hue and saturation selections. But even the most superlicious color won’t get me to buy after I’ve felt the fiber if the hand isn’t soft and supple.

  • Cindy T.

    As I become more experienced at knitting and wanting to knit more “designer” items, I am attracted to texture before color. I usually have a color in mind before I shop and if I can’t find it in the yarn I like, I’ll either select a second choice color or I’ll move on to another project. Right now I’m loving the Thick n Quick in Fig and Lemongrass. Every time someone sees me knitting with them, they either want me to knit something for them or they’re inspired to learn to knit themselves!

  • pat

    Color will attract my eye first, then texture. Durability and washability are next. Price does come in. I love Homespun and I love Wool Ease. I also did something in Vanna’s choice and it was still a little scratcy after washing and using fabric softener, but I can wear it because it is a shawl.

  • Jennifer S

    Color definitely attracts me first. But if I then touch the yarn and it feels itchy, I will try to find a great color in a softer yarn. I find almost all wool/wool blends to be itchy and therefore avoid most of them.

    The other really important item is ease of care. If I find a beautiful yarn but it is hand wash only, dry flat, I will only use it for a scarf or a *small* shawl. Those are items that I feel don’t need washing too often and I am willing to hand wash them. However, I will not make anything larger or anything requiring frequent washing, like a sweater, larger shawl, socks, or afghan, out of anything that’s not easy care because I know I won’t use it. I just don’t have time, space, or patience for hand wash, dry flat when it comes to larger or more frequently laundered items. Even if the color is beautiful and the texture great, if I avoid using a finished item because its care is a hassle for me, there’s no point making it.

  • cynthia martin

    most important is COLOR. i have to love how it looks. second is TEXTURE. i have to also love how it feels. third is cost. can i afford this yarn? or must i walk away and cry!

  • Caryn Seaton

    The yarn I use must work for newborn babies. I knit baby blankets for what I call “premature mothers”…the mothers who become mothers a little early. So often I see the blankets I give the Mums on the babies and its a thrill. So softness and neat colours is a consideration. I knit a blanket every four days so of course cost is another consideration since I give them away. Who has that much time to knit..I have serious medical stuff that allows me to knit and enjoy it.
    Peace be with you, Caryn

  • Sandra

    definately texture first then color. Color catches my eye, but if it doesn’t feel good I won’t buy it.

  • Carol

    Texture is my first choice, I am a very tactile person and the feel of the yarn is what grabs my attention. Colour is my second choice. I have my favourite colours, but if I am making a gift for someone, then I go with their favs. I am a compulsive yarnaholic; often buying yarns “just in case.” I have a stash large enough to start my own yarn shop, but when the mood strikes me for a new project, I can just shop at my own LYS.

  • DeAnne

    When I’m shopping for yarn, color will catch my eye, but the texture is the deciding factor. It has to be soft.

  • Jessica

    First, color. Second, texture. If I don’t like the feel for the particular project in mind, then I try to find the right texture in the same or similar color. Third, price. If 1 & 2 don’t really matter, I’ll go for the clearance yarn every time.

  • MARY ANN HUSLIG

    There are 2 ways of selecting yarn. By project or destashing. When doing a project, the 1st step for selecting yarn is selecting the project/pattern. I get bored easily so I prefer small projects which fits right into my passion for designing children’s clothing. You see this granny firmly believes a child should be dressed appropriatly for the occasion, 10% of the time jeans, cutoffs, T-shirts… are not appropriate. Along with the “boredom” if the last project was done in Pink Lemonade Babysoft yarn for Alexis’s sunday toddler sweater, it’s time for a Cherry Red Cotton-Ease back to school sweater vest for Johnnie.

    With a hugh stash! I just run my hands though the choices I have & ooooooooooo that feels so nice what animal can I make out of this…

  • Jennifer A

    I definitely go for color first and then choose the texture. I have to consider price also since I’m disabled and on a fixed income. But color is the one thing that always draws me to a delicious yarn. Then if the color is right for the project and the texture happens to be in my price range too then I’m ready to let the hooks fly!!!

  • http://www.Tygrlilies.com Angelica Bays

    1.Color
    2.Texture
    3.Durability
    4.Ease of use

    I do amigurumi so I need a good tensile strength because I like to make my stitches tight. I also don’t like the yarn to split or pill.

  • Vicki B

    I have some old yarn that was my grandmother’s. There are quite a few projects that she started and I’d now like to finish. One consists of various colors of knitted squares. I thought I’d crochet with one color around each of them and then assemble them into an afghan. There are no labels for the yarn, however, and I don’t know whether it is wool (which most of her yarn is) or acrylic.

    Is there a way to tell what type of yarn it is? What is my safest choice for the yarn that will tie the squares together?

    Thanks for any suggestions.

    Zontee says: Hi Vicki, the best way to test yarn is a burn test — you will find instructions if you do a quick web search. Secondly, when joining the squares, simply use the same type of yarn. You can check out our latest crochet-along with Edie Eckman for a couple of suggestions on different ways to join squares.

    Finally, please keep in mind that comments left on the blog should relate to the articles under which they are left. If you would like specific help, please e-mail our support team at support@lionbrand.com

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