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Archive for July 14th, 2011


Harry Potter-Inspired “Deathly Hallows” Patterns

July 14th, 2011

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Since 1997, when the first Harry Potter book was released, yarncrafters have had a special relationship with the wizarding world. Throughout the series, knitting patterns are mentioned over and over again, as are magical needles clicking away on scarves, sweaters, hats, and more. “Muggles”, a term from the books, has even become a popular word among yarncrafters for the non-yarny people in our lives! Yesterday, we featured a blog post with Harry Potter-inspired creations from our customers over the years, and today, I want to share with you some new patterns created in honor of the last Harry Potter film coming out this weekend.

I worked with Michelle (Lion Brand Yarn Studio Manager/Harry Potter über-fan) and Gina (speedy crocheter, whose crochet monster blog we’ve previously written about) to come up with special projects in honor of the second Deathly Hallows film. We’ve created the three Deathly Hallows, made in yarn:

Capelet of Invisibility Knit Capelet of Invisibility

Make this shimmering capelet–inspired by the Invisibility Cloak–with two strands of Vanna’s Glamourand big needles for a fast-finish project. Michelle made in a weekend and is pictured here, wearing her creation. She designed the hood to be long and to end in a point, for a wizardly touch.

Click here for the FREE pattern.

Resurrection Stone Ring Crochet Resurrection Stone Ring

Made with Vanna’s Glamour, with the symbol of the Deathly Hallows stitched on, this ring is quick to crochet and fun to wear. Tip from Gina: the ring-band can be made larger or smaller as needed–just chain more ore less stitches to start.

Click here for the FREE pattern.

Elder Wand Crafted Elder Wand

Just wrap and glue Vanna’s Choice to a dowl to create this fast and easy wand. To create the knots in the wood, Gina simply wrapped more yarn in those spots. One ball would easily create many wands, so you could make them for your friends too!

Click here for the FREE pattern.

We hope you’ll be making and enjoying these projects in honor of the new film–and if you spot me and Michelle, wearing our Deathly Hallow projects this weekend, feel free to stop us and say hi!


Mesh Raglan Pullover Crochet-Along: Starting Chain & Raglan Increases

July 14th, 2011

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Welcome back to the Mesh Raglan Pullover CAL! Hope you all had a good week of swatching adventures and have your hooks ready to go – it’s time to get this pullover going! This sweater is worked in the round and as such the traditional start is a long chain which is then joined with a slip stitch in the first chain to create a giant ring. Sounds simple enough, but the tricky thing is to make sure there isn’t a twist in the chain. If the chain is twisted it will always be that way and the top of your sweater won’t work up quite right.

Lucky for us, this pattern gives you another option for starting to eliminate this problem. In this alternative method, you work the first row of the pattern and then join for working in the round. This makes it much simpler because once you have the width of a row established it’s so much easier to see that it’s twist free.

First row
Click here to zoom.

An easier way to do something? Sign me up! To work the beginning this way, follow the instructions: “YOKE: Notes: 1.” listed above the traditional chain instructions. You’ll notice when you follow this method you will end with an extra chain after you work across – this is intentional! As the pattern states, you will later sew the ends of the first row together while weaving in your tails and this remaining ch-1 will become another space in the mesh pattern. Voila!

Yoke

At the end of this set up, just be sure you still remember to place your markers in each of the V-st spaces (4 total) and then proceed to Rnd 2. If you haven’t used markers before they are simply another way to make things easier for you! By putting a stitch marker in each V-st space, you’ll remember that is where you need to do work the following V-st to make the raglan increasing a success.

Markers

Speaking of increases, I just want to clarify how the increases at the four “corners” work. In all of the other stitches around you are skipping over the ch-1 spaces and working double crochet stitches in each dc across. For the increases, however, you work the dc in the dc as per the usual, ch-1, but then instead of skipping over the ch-1 space, that marked space is where you will work your V-st: dc, ch 1, dc. This will be followed by another ch 1, and yet another dc in the dc following the space. This is how the “corners” will look…

Corners

…and this is the result after the yoke increases are completed:

Yoke increases
Yoke increases

As you may have noticed from the photo above I already have the neck-tie in place. This is so I can try it on and know how it is going to fit when finished. As some of you may notice, the neck opening for this top is quite wide. This is because the finished garment has a neck-tie to cinch it to a closer fit, and I want to account for this while I try it on as I go. To do so, jump ahead to the “FINISHING” section, “Neck Tie,” but really it’s just a nice long chain that you then weave through the top of the mesh pattern. Ready to go!

I’m still deciding between two sizes, so I decided to slip the yoke on and see how it’s going for me. Uh oh…my row gauge is causing me some troubles! I didn’t think about the fact that the increases are worked on every round of this pattern, and as such if your row gauge is off, you will reach the correct stitch count, but it may not be long enough to reach to the underarm. Bummer. So now what?

I see two options:

  1. Use a hook that gets me the correct row gauge but wrong stitch gauge just for the yoke then switch hooks for the remainder of the pattern.
  2. Use the hook for your stitch gauge, work extra yoke increases and then account for the extra stitches by working fewer (or no) chains for the underarm and/or do a few increases after the underarm join when first working the body.

The H hook I chose not to use did achieve the correct row gauge, so using the larger hook for the yoke then switching to the G hook for the remainder of the top seems like the right choice in my case. I was debating between 2 sizes anyway, so this will give me a little more room in the bust without added width in the body. Plus if the yoke ends up a little big, the tie is there to tighten up the fit! I’m going to rip back to row 2 and redo the yoke, which is a bummer but that’s why we’re here to support each other by working through this together! It’s only 9 rows and it’s better to get it right. I was once told, “faster isn’t better, it’s just faster,” and I think that’s the perfect way to look at this.

Alright, I’m going to go rip mine back and go again, so get your yoke started and hopefully learn from my attempt. If you have other ideas for how to account for this problem, please comment below! That’s why we have a crochet-along: to learn from each other. Next week we’ll talk about creating the armhole openings and continuing to try on the start of your sweater to be sure you’re getting the fit you want!

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