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Flip My Scarf! 4 Different Projects from a Simple Rectangle

November 4th, 2011

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Over the years, I’ve met a lot of yarncrafters, young and old, who’ve told me, “I knit/crochet, but I only make scarves.” But what I want to tell these yarncrafters is, if you know how to make a scarf, you probably already know how to make throws, hoods–even garments! All you need are your scarf-making skills and two magic ingredients.

Ingredient one: Flip that scarf! Thinking outside the box will have you looking at your scarf in a whole new light. Fold it in half lengthwise. Twist it. Line several scarves up next to each other. Is your scarf starting to resemble something else, like a cocoon shrug or a blanket? You’re on the right track! All you need to do now is attach your work together at one or two key areas, and you have a whole new project. That takes us to…

Ingredient two: Join together! The best way to attach knit or crochet pieces together is to use seaming, or sewing up. If you haven’t seamed pieces together before, don’t be afraid to jump right in! Seaming yarncrafts is to sewing as paint-by-numbers is to painting with watercolors; the stitches act as a guide for where to go next, so you won’t have to worry about whether your sewing looks even. For an illustrated guide on how to seam knit pieces, click here. For a guide on how to seam crochet pieces, click here. (Need some extra guidance? Check out Zontee’s top 5 tips for seaming by clicking here.)

Looking for some inspiration on how to take your scarf to the next level? Here are some project ideas that are really just scarves in disguise. (Note: click the name or photo to access the pattern on LionBrand.com.)

Moebius WrapThe simplest way to update a plain scarf is to seam the short ends together to make a cowl. Take that idea one more step by twisting the scarf a 1/2 turn before you do your seaming, and you’ve got an elegant and versatile wrap!

To wear, drape the wrap off your shoulders as shown here. You can also wear it doubled as a cowl or over your head as an impromptu hood.

 

Scarf Hood The name says it all: this hood may look complicated, but it’s really a scarf in disguise! To make, simply fold your scarf in half crosswise and, starting at the fold, sew one side together for 11 inches. For an added challenge, add the crochet Fun Fur® trim, or leave it off for a more streamlined look.

To wear, leave the scarf ends hanging, or wrap them around your shoulders for extra warmth.

 

Striped Crochet Throw The pattern shown here uses striped colorwork, but you can make a nearly identical project without learning how to join new colors! To make, simply seam together scarves of equal length together along the long edge.

Seam together several wide strips to make an afghan. Or just use two or three narrow strips–you’ve got a throw that doubles as a shawl!

Cocoon Shrug This shrug is made from a shorter, wider rectangle than a traditional scarf, but making it uses the same set of skills. To make, fold the rectangle in half lenthwise. Sew the short ends together, starting at the edge and leaving a hole big enough for your arms to go through.

To wear, drape it over your shoulders as shown, let it fall for a more glamorous nighttime look, or even wear it over your head like a hood to keep the chill away.


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  • pat

    I’ve been crocheting for a long while now and am trying to learn to knit.  I am practicing by basically making scarves and each strip is practicing stockinette, garter and now ribs.  If I get really brave I might try cables.  The yarn is amazing as it amazes me.  It is lightweight and warm and fascinatingly amazing.  What will I do with those strips.  Seam them together and make a throw.  So try folks.  You can always rip it out and make a scarf.

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