Lion Brand Notebook

News, Ideas and Information for Crafting with Yarn

Image frame

Archive for July 5th, 2012


Announcing a NEW Column in The Weekly Stitch featuring Franklin Habit

July 5th, 2012

Pin It

If you’ve ever seen a clever cartoon about a sassy sheep and her knitting, chances are that you’ve met Dolores. The man behind the sheep is writer/illustrator/knitter/teacher/photographer (the man wears many hats!), Franklin Habit.

I first met Franklin in 2011 at Vogue Knitting Live New York, and since then, I’ve had a wonderful time getting to know him and his fantastic work. That’s why I’m so pleased to announce that Franklin will be joining us once a month in The Weekly Stitch, LionBrand.com’s newsletter, with a brand new column!

Excited as I am? Then get in the mood with episode 108 of YarnCraft from earlier this year, in which I got to interview Franklin about why he loves antique patterns, how to shoot better yarn photos, and the classes he teaches. Click here to read the show notes and/or listen using the player below:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Having trouble with the audio-player? Click here instead [MP3].

About Franklin Habit

Writer, illustrator, and photographer Franklin Habit is the author of It Itches: A Stash of Knitting Cartoons (Interweave Press, 2008–now in its third printing) and proprietor of The Panopticon (the-panopticon.blogspot.com), one of the most popular knitting blogs on Internet.  On an average day, upwards of 2,500 readers worldwide drop in for a mix of essays, cartoons, and the continuing adventures of Dolores the Sheep.

Franklin’s other publishing experience in the fiber world includes contributions to Vogue Knitting, Yarn Market News, Interweave Knits, Interweave Crochet, PieceWork, Cast On: A Podcast for Knitters, Twist Collective, and a regular column on historic knitting patterns for Knitty.com.

These days, Franklin knits and spins in Chicago, Illinois, sharing a small city apartment with an Ashford spinning wheel and colony of sock yarn that multiplies alarmingly whenever his back is turned.

Related links: