Lion Brand Notebook

News, Ideas and Information for Crafting with Yarn

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Part of Our Family History: A Handmade Gift From a Lion Brand Fan

July 6th, 2012

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Growing up in the Blumenthal family, I learned from an early age that gifts made with yarn are also made with care and thoughtfulness.

Being a part of Lion Brand Yarn my entire life, I’ve had the pleasure of seeing many hand-made gifts crafted with yarn and patience. Everyone knows that when they get a home-made gift, countless hours and a great deal of care went into making it. I’ve always felt very honored and lucky to receive gifts given with so much thought.

I like to keep gifts like that out in the open where they can be enjoyed. The piece in this picture hangs in my office at Lion Brand Yarn’s New Jersey headquarters. It was made for my father by my second grade teacher, as a thank-you present for all the yarn he’d given her over the years.

My favorite part of this imaginative and colorful design is the inclusion of so many intricate details. I particularly like the lion peeking out over the sign for “Blumenthal’s Quality Yarns Since 1878,” and how she took the time to re-create my father’s order book with embroidery in the right-hand corner. She even included a road sign to show that the yarn cart is rolling down Orchard Street, the street where Lion Brand Yarn headquarters were for many years.

I love seeing this piece in my office every day; not only because I love colorful art (especially when it’s made of yarn), but also because it reminds me of how handmade projects connect people to one another. She took so much time making it, hand-stitching details that cover every bit of the canvas, all out of gratitude. It reminds me that making excellent yarn is a part of my family history, a tradition that’s been passed down for generations.

Do you like to make handmade gifts for the people in your life, or have a special treasure that was handmade for you? I’d love to hear what kind of projects you’ve made and received as gifts!

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  • Marelcas96

    I have crocheted many scarves and afghans. Mainly for my family and extended family. The scarves I made were for family too, although I have crocheted several for myself, and I would receive a comment about how much they just loved the scarf…well, of course I would take it from around my neck and gift it to them! I think everyone should have something handmade!
    I have always wanted to learn to knit and this year I have finally done so, I have knitted the basics of course…dish cloths, and a scarf. Still learning, want to try socks soon!

  • Mary T

    Having a doll’s dress that my mother made for me (to match one in an old hand-colored photo of me with the doll in it’s original dress) is special for this great grandmother.  Just made the illusion skull scarf – challenging and so exciting!  Have made many comfort shawls and most were received with wonder at my picking the favorite color of the people who got them!  Making a “Florida” comfort shawl to accomodate the heat but still hold hugs.  Having Barbie clothes I made for my daughter so long ago.  These are all treasures.  And like Marelcas96, I usually wear a scarf till someone admires it, then off it goes to be treasured by a happy stranger.  I recommend Lion Brand help to many and have surely used it myself (especially with the skull scarf!.  Thanks for many hours of creativity, relaxation, and chats with my special stitch and chat group. 

  • ANNETTECIGAnko

    EVERY PRETTY TO ME GOOD CROCHETED

  • Gloria Saltzberg

    I was born in October 1934 and from that day I wore knitted clothing. Via my mom. I didn’t have a
    “store-bought” snow suit until I was 8 years old. She was very generous with her creations and almost any
    child who entered our home had on one of mom’s items. She knit for her friends children, their
    children and again for another generation.  Also mychildren my grandchildren and my dog.

    Thanks for bringing back these precious memories back to me.

  • Donna H–Seattle

    I come from a long line of knitters/crocheters. I remember watching my grandmother knit into the late hours of the night and to wake up seeing a new sweater had come alive. Although my grandmother didn’t take the time to teach me to knit, a very sweet next door neighbor did. I was nine. We would sit and eat radish sandwiches (try them, they are very good!) and knit. I picked up crochet after my Mom showed me how to lay the foundation and single and double crochet.
    This last Christmas I gave everyone on my list a knitted or crocheted item as their gift. Some really appreciated it and some just looked at it as though it was just something really passe. I will continue to make handmade items for gifts hoping that someday, someone who receives my gift (possibly from a thrift store) will understand the time and love that goes into each stitch. Happy sttches to everyone!

  • Heather McLeland-Wieser

    My step-grandmother taught me to crochet making clothes for my Barbie dolls. But knitting had an evil name in our house whole growing up because my other grandmother, who kbit beautifully, had NO sense of color and regularly sent us slippers, afghans and sweaters in the most ghastly color combinations. Looking back I suspect that she was getting her yarns from donations and that her failing eye sight made her reach for the bright colors because she could see the more clearly. She obviously knit with love and I do have a few of her afghans around nearly 50 years later. I learned to knit by myself after my kids came along. Both my daughter and son knit now and we trade homemade presents each year at Christmas with great joy. No one us interested in crocheted Barbie cloths though, sadly.

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