Lion Brand Notebook

News, Ideas and Information for Crafting with Yarn

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Archive for August, 2013


Learn to Knit with Easy-to-Follow Videos

August 16th, 2013

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Are you a visual learner who’s interested in knitting? Learn with our video playlist!

Already know how to knit? Spread the love! Share this blog post with your friends who want to learn!

If you’re reading this blog post in your email or an RSS reader, please click on the title to view the full blog post and videos on our website.

For more blog posts on knitting, check out:

 


Learn to Knit with Imagine Yarn in 5 Easy Steps!

August 15th, 2013

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One Ball Twirly Scarf

Have you been admiring our beautiful Imagine yarn but can’t wrap your mind around how to knit with it? Imagine’s webbed tubing construction is what makes it unique but it can also seem tricky to work with at first. I’ve broken it down into five simple steps for you so you’ll have the confidence to try it for yourself!

Click here to see the pattern for the project shown on the left!

How-to-Knit-with-Imagine


Announcing Our Fall 2013 Crochet-Along Project: the Colorfully Modern Cardigan

August 14th, 2013

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Several times a year we host a crochet- or knit-along, a virtual event in which yarncrafters come together here online to work on one pattern together, share their experiences, and to learn together. There’s no need to sign up! Simply follow along with the blog posts at your own pace as you crochet your project, and feel free to share your comments and/or photos as you progress. Want to learn more? Click here for our guide.

The Votes Are In!

Over 20,000 (wow!) of you voted for our next online project, and the winning pattern for our crochet-along is the Colorfully Modern Cardigan!

CALbadge

Feel free to pick up this badge to use on your blog, Ravelry, etc to show that you’re participating! (Right-click on PCs or Ctrl+click on Macs to save it to your desktop and upload it to your site)

Crochet-Along Next Steps

1. This week, download the pattern (click here for the pattern) and read it through so you have a sense of how the project is going to take shape. We’ll be walking you through a different element each week, so don’t worry if you see anything you’re not familiar with!

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Showing Off the Goods! 9 Featured Projects from the Lion Brand Customer Gallery

August 13th, 2013

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Every once in a while we like to highlight the great project submissions that have been uploaded to our online Customer Gallery, and today I’ve got 9 great projects to share with and inspire you.  It’s always fun to see our patterns come to life by others, especially when made with modifications.  Take a look at the projects below, and see if something you created made a guest appearance!

Modified Snowstorm Hat Pattern #90022AD
Modified Snowstorm Hat Pattern
By: Myra Gabriel
Pattern: Snowstorm Hat
gallery Baby Throw with AppliqueBaby Throw with Toy Car Appliques
By: Myra Slatkoff
Pattern: Sunshine Day Baby Throw
Perfect Crochet CardiganPerfect Crochet Cardigan
By: Mary Cast
Pattern: Perfect Crochet
Cardigan

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Knitted Toys: The Slippery Slope

August 12th, 2013

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Writer and avid knitter Selma Moss-Ward joins us for a series of blog posts about becoming a first-time grandmother.

Many years ago, expecting my first child, I focused my knitting on baby clothes.  I saw these small projects as ideal canvases for learning complex techniques—Fair Isles, Arans, and other fancy work—and the garments I made tended to be, so to speak, labor intensive.

After my first and then second son outgrew them, the tiny sweaters, caps, and sundry garments were wrapped up and saved for The Future.  Now I’m delighted to report that a special baby will arrive in late November, when I become a first-time grandma.  The heirloom knits will go to him.

For this reason (and also because he’ll live in LA, where heavy clothing isn’t required), I decided to knit him something else…something unique…and something fun.  Combing through the Lion Brand pattern database, I found a trove of adorable designs for stuffed toys.

Unsurprisingly, I couldn’t limit myself to just one.  My first pattern choice, though, is a real winner.  A blast to knit, it took me less than three hours from start to finish including stuffing and embroidery, and is so adorable that I must make a companion for WILLIAM the HEDGEHOG in the very near future.  (There’s enough leftover yarn for this.)

Here are some photos of the finished William, and in my next post I’ll tell you about his creation.

William the Hedgehog | Lion Brand Notebook

William the Hedgehog | Lion Brand Notebook

Selma Moss-Ward is a freelance writer who combines her love of writing and of knitting in her columns, stories, and blog posts. Selma is also an active classical musician and the caretaker of five wonderful pets. She lives with them and her husband in Rhode Island. Read a monthly fiction story by Selma in our Pattern Journal newsletter.


Picking Up the Right Number of Stitches: Tips & Tricks

August 11th, 2013

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Throughout this season, we’re reposting some of our favorite columns by Barbara Breiterauthor of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Knitting & Crocheting, previously featured in our Weekly Stitch newsletter.

Many projects, particularly sweaters, will ask you to pick up stitches to complete a section, such as along the neckline, armholes, or the button band of a cardigan.

Your pattern will generally indicate how many stitches you need to pick up. But that number is based on the row gauge the designer achieved; your row gauge won’t always be identical, as it is very common to achieve the stitch gauge but not the row gauge of a pattern. You may have fewer rows or more rows available along which you can pick up the needed stitches.

If too many stitches are picked up, the resulting ribbing (or whatever pattern stitch you’re working) will flare out and will not lie flat. If too few stitches are picked up, it will pucker.

You can attempt to pick up the exact number of stitches specified, but you may end up frustrated. Here’s how to pick up the correct number, regardless of how many rows there are to work along.

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Reading Charts: An Introduction

August 10th, 2013

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Throughout this season, we’re reposting some of our favorite columns by Barbara Breiterauthor of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Knitting & Crocheting, previously featured in our Weekly Stitch newsletter.

Stitch patterns and motifs are sometimes presented in charts instead of written out in words. You sometimes see this in crochet, particularly in filet crochet, but it’s more common in knitting.

Charts have several advantages. The visual depiction enables you to easily see where you are in the pattern (and how the stitches line up) and thus it’s easier to keep your place. They generally contain fewer errors than written instructions, as it’s easier to see if something doesn’t align correctly.

There really is nothing to fear when working a chart. Each square represents a type of stitch or the color of the stitch to be worked, indicated by a symbol or the color you are to use. Stitch keys, or legends, are included so you’ll know the meaning of each symbol or color. [Bonus tip: If you’ve ever see a grayed out box that the legend tells you is “no stitch” and wondered what that meant, it means that the stitch was used up by a decrease in a previous row and no longer exists. Simply skip that box and keep going across the chart!]

For the vast majority of charts, you’ll begin reading charts at the lower right corner. The first row and all odd rows are read from right to left. The second and all even rows are read from left to right. With crochet charts, you’ll want to look for the starting point, which is usually at the number 1, representing the first row or sometimes by a symbol as indicated in the legend. As you complete each row, you can tick it off in the margin or move a Post-It note to cover rows already worked. This also prevents you from mistakenly working the wrong row.

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5 Videos: Knit, Crochet, and Craft with Imagine Yarn!

August 8th, 2013

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Have you tried our Imagine yarn yet? It’s a versatile yarn with a tube-like construction that allows you to knit or crochet with it to create flouncy ruffles.

You can also craft with it, opening up the net-like material to create cowls, scarves, and headbands that are no-knit-or-crochet. These easy projects are great for girl scout troop make-and-takes, birthday party activities, and more!

Want more ideas? Check out the 5 videos below for more project ideas:


Help Pick the NEXT Crochet-Along Project!

August 7th, 2013

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It’s that time of year again! Crochet-along with us as we make one of the following garments!

But FIRST you have to help us pick the pattern! Learn more about the patterns on LionBrand.com: Sunset ShrugColorfully Modern JacketTop Down Crochet Jacket.

« Click here to vote. »

Help Pick Our Fall 2013 Crochet-Along Project!

A crochet-along is a virtual event, where all the participants make the same project together. Follow along with crochet-along host Lauren here on the blog and share your comments and photos. There’s no need to sign up, and it’s free to join(New to crochet-alongs? Check out our guide here.)

The winning pattern will be announced next Wednesday on the blog—when we’ll also give you details on picking up your supplies and getting started on the project!

Votes must be cast by 12:00 am Eastern August 13, 2013. You must use the link above to vote; comments here on the blog do NOT count as votes.

Knitters, look out for a knit-along later this year, here on the Lion Brand Notebook.


A-B-C-K-2-P-2

August 6th, 2013

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Writer, illustrator, and knitter Franklin Habit joins us for his monthly column featuring humor and insights into a yarncrafter’s life.

I was a good student, but it would be fibbing of the most bald-faced and lamentable variety to tell you I enjoyed school. I hated school, in part because I invariably showed up on the first day wearing the wrong sort of sneakers, and was therefore declared by the girls on the playground to be covered in cooties.

I wasn’t much happier in the classroom. Each new year we were driven into a slightly more impenetrable thicket of the same dreary subjects by teachers who grew annually more gaunt and listless. Even the classes I enjoyed ultimately felt disconnected, irrelevant. I’d master the list of state capitals, or after days of tears successfully divide 283 by 14–only to think, “So what?”

“You’ll need this some day,” the teachers insisted, but that’s insufficient justification for a little kid. It’s tough to take the long view of things when you’re seven years old. It’s tough to see the horizon when you’re four feet tall.

Now I’m considerably older (though not much taller) and I’m wondering why the heck they didn’t just teach us to knit and crochet. If you can get a kid excited about a ball of yarn, you can get her excited about the entire curriculum that’s directly connected to that ball of yarn.

Check it out.

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