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Archive for September 11th, 2013


Colorfully Modern Cardigan Crochet-Along #4: Blocking, Seaming, and Surface Stitches

September 11th, 2013

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Colorfully Modern Cardigan Crochet-Along #4: Blocking, Seaming, and Surface StitchesHi guys! I see a lot of you have finished your cardigans already. Looking good! Don’t forget to post pictures.

[Editor's Note: Click here to see photos in our Ravelry group, and if you'd like to leave a photo here on the blog, click in the commenting box and you'll see a little "mountain range" icon. Click it to browse to your photo on your computer and upload it to your comment.]

I considered making the sleeves a little longer, but in the end, I decided in the end to make them the same length as in the pattern. However, if you’d like to lengthen your sleeves, it should be pretty easy to do.

Lengthening the Sleeves

The easiest way to lengthen the design is to just work the number of chains for your size and work even until your sleeve has however much longer that you’d like than the one in the pattern, then follow the pattern as set.

The pattern schematic tells us that the sleeve-to-armpit measurement is 9 inches for all sizes. Let’s say that I want my sleeve to be 16.5 inches (16 to 17 inches is a standard length for women’s sleeves). That’s 7.5 more inches. Our pattern gauge tells us that each row is 0.31 inches (4 inches ÷ 13 rows = 0.31 inches per row).

7.5 inches ÷ 0.31 inches per row = 24.19 rows

Our color repeat is ABCDED and each color is used for 2 rows, so 24 rows is two full sets of all of the colors. Therefore, I’d do 24 rows straight, before following the pattern as set. (If you want to make your sleeves longer or shorter, you may need to do a partial repeat of the color pattern, so be sure to plan for that.)

Tips on Blocking

After the sleeves,  I had all the pieces finished, so it was time to block. Don’t skip this step! It can make your garment look much more professionally-made and neaten up any uneven stitches. While you can block after your entire garment is done, many people find it helpful to block your garment before sewing it together, as this way you can correct the measurements of any part where your tension may have changed a little.

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