Lion Brand Notebook

News, Ideas and Information for Crafting with Yarn

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Archive for September, 2013


4 New Yarns in Our Fall Catalog

September 24th, 2013

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Love discovering the latest thing? Be sure to check out these 4 yarns that are part of our fall 2013 line. You’ll be seeing them in our upcoming catalog and in stores, but in the meantime, they are already available on LionBrand.com!

Romance<SUP>® </SUP>

Romance®

Ultra-soft and feathery Romance is a luxurious faux fur yarn you’re going to love for collars, scarves, and trim on your projects.

Click here for a video featuring just a few project ideas.

Click here to see all 15 colors and order online.

 

Unique

Unique

Create stunning, colorful projects with this new bulky-weight yarn. Each colorway is bold, making it perfect for statement pieces.

Click here to see knit samples of each colorway.

Click here to see all 6 colors and order online.

Martha Stewart Crafts<SUP>TM/MC</SUP> Glitter Ribbon

Martha Stewart Crafts™ Glitter Ribbon

This shimmery, metallic yarn is great for craft projects, as well as quick knit and crochet projects. Try it in a drop-stitch design or an openwork stitch for a cool effect.

Click here to see all 9 colors and order online.

LB Collection<SUP>® </SUP> Silk

LB Collection® Silk Yarn

A prized fiber for centuries, 100% silk is lustrous and soft. Discover this hand-dyed version from our exclusive LB Collection (only available from LionBrand.com and our own retail locations). Learn more with our earlier blog post.

Click here to see all 8 colors and order online.

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Understanding Common Pattern Terms, Part 2

September 23rd, 2013

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Throughout this season, we’re reposting some of our favorite columns by Barbara Breiterauthor of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Knitting & Crocheting, previously featured in our Weekly Stitch newsletter.

Understanding Common Pattern Terms, Part 2 | Lion Brand NotebookLast week, I wrote about pattern terms and concepts people often find confusing. This week, I am covering a couple more concepts that you will often encounter.

Parentheses, brackets, asterisks, and phrases are commonly found in patterns; they are intended to make it easier to follow, and they also decrease the chances of a typographical error in a pattern. Here’s some help on deciphering what you are being asked to do.

Parentheses

You will find parentheses or () used in two ways:

The first is to indicate you are to repeat everything in parentheses the given number of times. For example:

(k2tog, yo) twice

What it means is that you should work k2tog, yo two times or k2tog, yo, k2tog, yo.

The second way they are used is to show a grouping or sequence of stitches that are related to each other in some way. You might see (2 dc, ch 3, 2 dc) in next ch-1 sp. The pattern is telling you that everything in the parentheses is all worked into the next ch-1 space.

Brackets

Brackets or [] indicate either to repeat something or a sequence of stitches, just as parentheses do; however, a bracket is needed when a set of instructions within the brackets are already in parentheses. Occasionally, you will brackets used instead of parentheses.

In this example, brackets are being used to indicate you are repeating instructions:

[k2, (yo, k2tog) 3 times] twice

The above means that you would repeat everything in the brackets twice while making sure you also repeat yo, k2tog 3 times in the order written.

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The Ups and Downs of Knitting: Counting Your Rows

September 23rd, 2013

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You, our readers, asked for it and we’re happy to oblige! Designer and teacher Heather Lodinsky joins us for a new article on understanding the fundamentals of your knitting.

Knowing exactly where you are in a knitting project requires knowing where you have been. “Reading” your stitches by identifying a knit versus a purl stitch is helpful in showing you where you are in a stitch pattern. In the last article I wrote, I showed how to identify the stitches already worked to know where you are in your knitting.

Sometimes no matter how hard I try, I can easily lose track of which row I am working in a pattern. Life happens—the phone rings, we get talking or we just have to leave our knitting for some reason.  Then I come back to my knitting and…what row was I working? There are various tools out there to help us keep track of our rows. Row counters exist that either attach to your needle, or need to be clicked and there are even “counting boards” where pegs are moved to show what row we are working. Even the simple “hash mark” on a piece of paper works well, but there is still  that human element of just plain forgetting to mark the paper, move the peg or click the counter to the next number. As a knitting teacher, one of the most common questions I am asked is: “What row am I on?”

A skill as important as identifying your stitches is the ability to count your rows without a “counter”. The best way to count stitches is by first identifying a stitch and then being able to count stitches up and down, which will tell us how many rows we have done and what row we need to work next.

Counting Rows in Stockinette Stitch

Stockinette Stitch | Counting Your Rows | Lion Brand Notebook

Click the image to enlarge.

Lets’s first look at stockinette stitch – which, when we are working a flat piece, is knitted on the right side  of the fabric and purled on the wrong side.  First, we have to be able to identify a “knit” stitch.  Look closely at the right side of stockinette stitch and see that a knit stitch looks like a “V”.   This is what we are looking for in order to help us count our rows.

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Understanding Common Pattern Terms, Part 1

September 19th, 2013

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Throughout this season, we’re reposting some of our favorite columns by Barbara Breiterauthor of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Knitting & Crocheting, previously featured in our Weekly Stitch newsletter.

Understanding Common Pattern Terms, Part 1 | Lion Brand NotebookA pattern is a blueprint for a project. A well-written pattern doesn’t intentionally confuse you. If you find something confusing, keep in mind that sometimes the pattern is simply trying to convey information to help you. The term might be an industry standard, but one that you’ve never come across before.

Here are some terms and concepts, commonly used but also commonly confusing to many knitters and crocheters.

Work even

Work even means to work in the pattern stitch over the number of stitches you have at the present time. It often follows a sequence where you have just completed increasing or decreasing.

Turn

Although crocheting often uses this term at the end of every row (for example, chain 1, turn), it’s also used in places that, at first glance, don’t appear to make sense. When working short rows, or partial rows of knitting or crocheting, you will see an instruction to turn while not at the end of the row. Simply complete the instructions for that row, and when the pattern states turn, prepare to work in the other direction and the next row by turning your work around just as if you were at the end of the row. It may seem wrong to do so, but sometimes you have to have faith that a pattern works out in the end!

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Lessons Learned From Crafting – A New Animated Series!

September 18th, 2013

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We asked our customers on Facebook what lessons they’ve learned from crafting over the years. I was so inspired by the responses we got that I created an animated series! Share your story and you might get animated!

Subscribe to our Youtube channel here to make sure you don’t miss the next episode!

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