Lion Brand Notebook

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Colorfully Modern Cardigan Crochet-Along #4: Blocking, Seaming, and Surface Stitches

September 11th, 2013

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Colorfully Modern Cardigan Crochet-Along #4: Blocking, Seaming, and Surface StitchesHi guys! I see a lot of you have finished your cardigans already. Looking good! Don’t forget to post pictures.

[Editor’s Note: Click here to see photos in our Ravelry group, and if you’d like to leave a photo here on the blog, click in the commenting box and you’ll see a little “mountain range” icon. Click it to browse to your photo on your computer and upload it to your comment.]

I considered making the sleeves a little longer, but in the end, I decided in the end to make them the same length as in the pattern. However, if you’d like to lengthen your sleeves, it should be pretty easy to do.

Lengthening the Sleeves

The easiest way to lengthen the design is to just work the number of chains for your size and work even until your sleeve has however much longer that you’d like than the one in the pattern, then follow the pattern as set.

The pattern schematic tells us that the sleeve-to-armpit measurement is 9 inches for all sizes. Let’s say that I want my sleeve to be 16.5 inches (16 to 17 inches is a standard length for women’s sleeves). That’s 7.5 more inches. Our pattern gauge tells us that each row is 0.31 inches (4 inches ÷ 13 rows = 0.31 inches per row).

7.5 inches ÷ 0.31 inches per row = 24.19 rows

Our color repeat is ABCDED and each color is used for 2 rows, so 24 rows is two full sets of all of the colors. Therefore, I’d do 24 rows straight, before following the pattern as set. (If you want to make your sleeves longer or shorter, you may need to do a partial repeat of the color pattern, so be sure to plan for that.)

Tips on Blocking

After the sleeves,  I had all the pieces finished, so it was time to block. Don’t skip this step! It can make your garment look much more professionally-made and neaten up any uneven stitches. While you can block after your entire garment is done, many people find it helpful to block your garment before sewing it together, as this way you can correct the measurements of any part where your tension may have changed a little.

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Colorfully Modern Cardigan Crochet-Along #3: The Fronts and Pockets

September 4th, 2013

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Colorfully Modern Cardigan Crochet-Along #3: The Fronts and Pockets | Lion Brand NotebookHi everyone! I hope you guys had a great holiday weekend and those sweaters are coming along nicely! This week I was busy making the fronts of my cardigan. I know a few of you wondering about how the pockets join to the body, so we’ll start with that.

Making the Pockets

I had a little trouble joining the pockets, as I just assumed I knew what to do, so I didn’t read the pattern carefully, and kept wondering why I didn’t have enough stitches left at the end! Learn from my mistake! To join the pocket-lining, work the number of stitches required for your size, on the body of the cardigan as normal (this is a wrong side row, so it’s all in single crochet), then skip the first stitch of the pocket lining (this is where I kept going wrong!) and work across the top of the lining, skip the last stitch and skipping 17 body stitches from the first join, single crochet in the next body stitch and work to the end.

Colorfully Modern Cardigan Crochet-Along #3: The Fronts and Pockets | Lion Brand Notebook
 Click the photo to enlarge.

Colorfully Modern Cardigan Crochet-Along #3: The Fronts and Pockets | Lion Brand Notebook
 Click the photo to enlarge.

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Colorfully Modern Cardigan Crochet-Along #2: Making the Back & Changing Colors

August 28th, 2013

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CALbadgeHi everyone! I’ve been very impressed by all the pictures I’ve seen of your projects so far and so many great color combinations!

[Editor’s Note: Click here to see photos in our Ravelry group, and if you’d like to leave a photo here on the blog, click in the commenting box and you’ll see a little “mountain range” icon. Click it to browse to your photo on your computer and upload it to your comment.]

Making the Back & Changing Colors

This week I worked on the back of my cardigan. To avoid having to weave in all those ends, I had planned to carry the colors up the side and hide them in the seaming process, but I found that having 5 balls of yarn attached to my project at all times drove me a little crazy! So instead I decided to weave the ends in as I crocheted, hiding them by holding the ends of the new and old colors together on the WS of the work and crocheting over them as I made the stitches. Now all I’ll need to do is snip off the ends when I’m finished. This is my favorite method of hiding ends for crochet, especially for color-work.

Colorfully Modern Cardigan Crochet-Along #2: Making the Back & Changing Colors | Lion Brand Notebook

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Colorfully Modern Cardigan Crochet-Along #1: Size & Gauge Swatching

August 21st, 2013

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Colorfully Modern Cardigan Crochet-Along #1: Size & Gauge SwatchingHi everyone! My name is Lauren, and I’m very excited to be your Crochet-Along host for the Colorfully Modern Cardigan. I work at the Lion Brand Yarn Studio in New York City as a knitting and crochet instructor, a great job if you’re as yarn-obsessed as I am.

I was very pleased when you guys voted for this project, as it would have ended up on my “must make” list anyway. Also, I needed an excuse to work with our newest yarn Unique. I love any kind of color-work, especially when the yarn is doing all the hard work for you!

Please don’t be intimidated by the complicated look of the cardigan; it’s really only 2 pattern rows repeated over and over. Even if you are new to garment making, I would encourage you to have a go with this project, as we can all help each other, each step of the way! Please feel free to ask me questions here and visit our Ravelry group. I’d love to see your projects progressing.

Selecting a Size

The first thing you’ll want to do is accurately measure yourself, so you can choose a size. With a flexible tape measure, measure yourself around the fullest part of your bust, wearing whatever clothes you plan to wear underneath your cardigan. I measured myself wearing a t-shirt and sweater, because I plan for this project to be my fall jacket.

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Custom Raglan Cardi Knit-Along, Week 6: Embellishing and Blocking Your Finished Sweater

March 29th, 2012

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Knit-Along BadgeHi, everyone. Today I’m going to be talking about the final stages of making your sweater, and how you can keep on adding design elements even after all the knitting is complete! Once you’ve picked up the bands and sewn the sleeve seams and woven in all those ends, there’s still things you can do to change the look of your sweater.

Adding Embellishments

One of my favorite ways to add some interest to a plain stockinette sweater is embroidery. I enjoy doing a method called duplicate stitch, with which you can put pictures on your garment, similar in look to intarsia, but much less fiddly! If you find an intarsia chart you like the look of, you can actually use this method to embroider it on to your sweater. It’s also a great way to use up random scraps of yarn!

With duplicate stitch, you are actually mimicking the look of stockinette stitch. You use a darning needle threaded with yarn in a different color to your base fabric, drawing over the chosen stitches so that they are covered with the different colored strand of yarn. This is a very easy method to add little motifs to your work. Be wary of covering large areas of fabric with this method, however, as it does make the fabric doubly thick in the covered areas.

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