Lion Brand Notebook

News, Ideas and Information for Crafting with Yarn

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Archive for the 'Knitting' Category

Celebrate the Stars and Stripes With These Flag Day Patterns!

June 14th, 2015

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Did you know? Although the most patriotic day — Independence Day — is celebrated on July 4th, Flag Day commemorates our nation officially adopting the stars-and-stripes-patterned flag on June 14th, 1777.

Natasha of Alaska Knit Hat designed this Old Glory hat – made with Woolspun® – just in time for a chilly summer in Alaska!



Stars, stripes, pom-poms — this pattern’s got it all!

For more inspiration, check out our pattern recommendations below, as well as our Independence Day Pattern Round-Up!

patriotic_scarf stripe_afghan
Knit Heartland Patriotic Scarf, made with Heartland® Crochet American Flag Dishcloth by Being Spiffy*
Made with Kitchen Cotton
Crochet USA Afghan, made with Hometown USA®

Wondering which of our yarns are made here in the U.S.A.? Watch the video below or click here for a full list!

::Having trouble seeing this video? Click to watch:


*Not a Lion Brand Pattern

Grab Your Knits and Head Out for World Wide Knit in Public Day!

June 11th, 2015

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Too often, knitting and crocheting is seen as antiquated or “old school.” As a millenial-aged knitter, I know this simply isn’t true. I learned to knit because I love crafting, and knitting
was a family tradition I’d always observed, but never participated in. Once I started knitting (almost a year and a half ago now), I couldn’t believe I hadn’t started sooner.

I’ve knit on crowded subway cars, in the park, and in work breakrooms. In fact, when I knit on my lunch-break at my old job, I got several other co-workers hooked! Soon, we had a couple of round looms being passed around so everyone had a turn making hats for the winter.

What I’ve found with knitting public is that it opens up a dialogue. People feel compelled to tell you about the knitters and crocheters in their family and the gifts they’ve received. They ask what you’re making, how long it takes you, what have you made previously… The list goes on! If you take your knitting out of the house, I’m sure you’re familiar.

Knitting can be a social hobby, which is what makes World Wide Knit in Public Day so special! It’s a day to celebrate your passion, join up with fellow crafters, and share your projects in progress. This year’s WWKIP day is June 13th. Guilds all over the world are posting their meet-up spots to celebrate the occasion; chances are, there’s one in your area!

Even if every day is “Knit in Public” day for you, it’s fun to acknowledge a shared interest. Use hashtag #wwkip on social networks to keep up with other knitters, and post your own pics!

Where will you take your knitting to on June 13th? Where’s your favorite place to knit (in public or not)? Share with us!


We Like How You Use Our Yarn: Knit Amigurumi Raccoon by Lisa Eberhart

June 10th, 2015

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Here’s one raccoon you won’t mind sharing your backyard with this summer!

Knit designer Lisa Eberhart is the designer of this adorable knit amigurumi which uses Vanna’s Choice® yarn.


This is a paid pattern, available through Ravelry for $3.99.

:: Vanna’s Choice® colors seen here in Grey, Black, White and Baby Pink. ::

Out of the Box Knit Project: Mood Scarves!

June 8th, 2015

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Here, three colors of LB Collection ® Angora Merino
are chosen to reflect three different moods.
Knitting can incite a lot of feelings — frustration over slipped stitches, joy at a completed piece, or even fear at an overwhelming yarn stash! For most, knitting is a way of unwinding at the end of a long day, or taking some time out of our schedules to focus on “me-time.”

One of my most anticipated movies this summer is “Inside Out”, Pixar’s take on the emotions that “live” inside everyone’s head, and how they work together. With this concept in mind, I set out to find knitting projects based on moods, and found a really fantastic project!

Mood Scarves are a conceptual knitting project that take patience and reflection. Yarn colors are chosen based on what feelings you’ve decided to track, with each color corresponding to a specific feeling.


The idea is to develop the project over a set amount of time — maybe it’s just a season, or the entire year! At the end of the project, you can look back at your work and see your feelings reflected.

Jem Weston shows her asymmetric mood scarf. Pattern here.*

The pattern? Knit 2 rows in the color reflecting your feelings for the day. That’s it!

Of course, a little guidance goes a long way. Simple patterns, where changing yarn colors is called for, are good outlines for which to start out a project.

left bank kaitlyn cowl loop scarf
Knit Left Bank Scarf Knit Kaitlyn Cowl Knit Loop Scarf

There’s so much freedom in a project like this. Picking colors, picking the type of stitch, picking a time to reflect on… it goes on! Since the project is so personal, no two scarves will ever end up identical.

What do you reflect on when you knit? What colors would you use to track your mood? Share with us in the comments below!

* Not a Lion Brand Pattern.

Bait and Stitch by Franklin Habit

June 5th, 2015

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Writer, illustrator, and knitter Franklin Habit joins us for his monthly column featuring humor and insights into a yarncrafter’s life.

I don’t know about you, but if the person who invented the “click bait” headline suffered severe contusions after being buried alive in an avalanche of refurbished laptop computers I would not weep heavily into my handkerchief.

Unless you’re reading a transcription of this online article from a parchment scroll, you know what click bait is. You’re fooling around on the Internet when something like this catches your eye:

“She Ordered a Half-Caff Double Latte with Extra Foam. What She Got Instead Will Shock You.”

Being only human, you immediately cease writing a wry comment on the photograph of your sister-in-law’s new pet ocelot (a rescue, so cute) and click the link. Being only human, you brace yourself for the advertised shock.

Being only human, you are annoyed to find that What She Got Instead was not (as you had rather hoped) a cardboard cup containing a human nose; but a Half-Caff Double Latte without the Extra Foam. You have wasted two minutes of your life, you are not shocked, and in the meantime your own daughter has already written the clever thing you were going write on the picture of the ocelot.



This was bad enough when it was new; now it has become pervasive. The time lost is the worst of it. We are all too busy, in a gadabout age, without running after shocks that do not shock and amazement that fails to amaze.

And those of us who have things to knit, to crochet, to weave–can we stand to lose precious moments this way? We cannot. Life is short. Yarn is long.

Therefore, as a service to the public, I have undertaken to collect the latest crop of click bait and present you with a concise summary of the bait beyond the click. If you wish to investigate further, at least you will know what you’re getting into.