Lion Brand Notebook

News, Ideas and Information for Crafting with Yarn

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Archive for March, 2012


Get an Exclusive Illusion Scarf Pattern in Honor of Croak!

March 20th, 2012

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When former Lion Brand Yarn Studio associate Gina Damico first told us that she was writing a young adult novel called Croak, we thought it was awesome news. But when she told us that she wanted to design an exclusive pattern inspired by the book, we were even more excited!

So what’s Croak about? It’s the story of Lex, a 16 year-old girl who is sent to live with her Uncle Mort for the summer, hoping that a few months of work on his farm will settle her wild ways. But Uncle Mort’s actually a Grim Reaper and he takes Lex under his wing. Join Lex as she explores the world of the reapers, in Gina’s debut novel.

In honor of her novel, Gina’s created an illusion scarf whose pattern you can only see at certain angles. Gina said about her inspiration:

I’ve always been a big fan of illusion knitting – it’s simple, fun, and creates an amazing effect that will impress the socks AND shoes off everyone you show it to. So when thinking about a fun accessory to create in conjunction with the release of Croak, an illusion scarf was the natural choice. Black and red stripes make for a quirky, offbeat look, and since the book is about grim reapers, the colors fit perfectly. As for the design, skulls were a must. They tie in to the plot, they offer a hint of the dark humor within, and as the saying goes, everyone loves a good skull. (I think that’s a saying. Eh, maybe not.) Thanks so much to Lion Brand for the chance to share my designs, and I hope you enjoy both the pattern and Croak!

Click here for the pattern on LionBrand.com!

Croak comes out TODAY and we’re so excited to get our hands on our own copies, so click here to learn more about it on Amazon and get one for yourself!

EDIT (10/18/12): Get the second book in the series, Scorch, now available in bookstores and online!


5 Tips for Crafting Outside in the Spring and Summer

March 19th, 2012

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Fall and Winter are busy seasons for knitting and crochet; after all, we’d be pretty chilly without the hats, scarves, mittens, sweaters, and cowls that we make every year!

Take your Knitting and Crochet Outside

But what about crafting when it’s warm outside?

These simple tips will help you pick the patterns you’d try this spring and summer, choose the perfect yarns for your  projects, inspire you with some new techniques to try and (most importantly) get you ready to enjoy the warm weather headed your way! (Want to make the flowers in this picture? Click here for the patterns from 100 Flowers to Knit & Crochet by Lesley Stanfield.)

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March is National Crochet Month AND National Craft Month!

March 18th, 2012

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National Craft MonthDid you know that March is both National Crochet Month and National Craft Month? It’s such an exciting month, and there are so many different ways to celebrate. Our favorite way, of course, is to give back to others through teaching. If you’d like to teach a friend, relative, or complete stranger how to crochet or knit, we have many resources to support you. You can find helpful instructions, illustrations, and videos at learntocrochet.lionbrand.com and learntoknit.lionbrand.com.

We also have lots of blog posts to support your teaching. Here are some of our favorite posts.

As you’re teaching friends, remember to check out the two great sweepstakes sponsored by our friends at Knitty Daily. Click here to find out how you can win some amazing books and DVDs. I hope you celebrate the rest of the month with tons of crafting, crocheting, and knitting!


Custom Raglan Cardi Knit-Along, Week 4: All About Sleeves

March 15th, 2012

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Knit-Along BadgeHi everyone! This week is going to be all about sleeves. In this pattern, the sleeves are put on hold until the body is completed. Then, the sleeve stitches are slipped back on the needle, and the ribbed border is started for short, t-shirt-length sleeves.

Lengthening the Sleeves

I decided that I’d like to do full-length sleeves. Lengthening your sleeves is pretty easy, especially if you’d like a casual looking sleeve with no shaping–just keep working until the sleeve is as long as you’d like it to be. However, I wanted more fitted looking sleeves, so I measured around my upper arm, just below my elbow and then around my wrist. Next I took vertical measurements to get the distance between those 3 points. Then, to work out how many and where my decreases should fall, I just used the same formula from my last post that I used for decreasing for the waist. For the sleeves, you’ll only be decreasing twice in each decrease row, once at each edge, rather than the four decreases across a row for the body. I placed my decreases two stitches in from the edge, to leave the edges nice and neat for seaming later on.

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Increases for Knitting

March 14th, 2012

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Last week, I discussed directional decreases for knitting. Of course, there are also many types of increases you can use to create shaping.

Knit Increases

Let’s go over the increases, starting with the bottom. The yarn over (yo) increase is a great decorative option that works well on either side of your work. Keep in mind that the finished stitch leaves an eyelet.

The knit in front and back (kfb) increase is also referred to as a bar increase. The completed increase appears to be your regular knit stitch on the right, plus a new purl stitch on the left. Because the new stitch is formed to the left, your original knit stitch will slant a little to the right. Despite this, the kfb is a quick, simple increase that works on either side.

For directional increases, I most often use make 1 right (m1r) and make 1 left (m1l). These variations of the make 1 increase create smooth, almost invisible increases that mirror each other very well. That’s why they’re my go-to increases.

Another option for directional increases is a lifted increase. The right lifted increases (RLI) and left lifted increase (LLI) have similar results to the make 1 increases, so they’re a great choice if you’re doing increases every few rows. However, I’d advise against them if you’re increases every right side row, as this increase can create some puckering and a noticeable line when used on every other row.

While there are other knitting increases, I find that these 4 techniques get me through most situations. Now you know how each increase looks, so when your knitting pattern calls for a vague “increase 1 stitch”, you can make your stitch selection with confidence.

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