Lion Brand Notebook

News, Ideas and Information for Crafting with Yarn

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Archive for the 'Crocheting' Category


Glittery Shrug Crochet-Along: Working the Lower Border Edging and the Upper Mesh

June 7th, 2012

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Shrug BadgeHello everyone! Hope you all are doing well on the first part of your Glittery Shrug! If you decided to start the lower half last week and didn’t get through it all, that’s ok! It’s the most time intensive part, but working on both pieces together helps to break up working all that single crochet.

Working the Lower Border Edging

One thing that I hadn’t mentioned last week about the lower part of the shrug is the border edging. When you are done with the lower half, you are ready to move onto the border. The border is super simple and is worked across the bottom edge of the lower half (the straight edge that measures 26 inches). If you kept the underarms sloped, then this measurement will be from the marker to where you start decreasing for the right sleeve. The border is just one row of single crochet, then one row of double crochet.
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5 Fun Summertime Projects From Crafty Bloggers!

June 4th, 2012

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With the changing of the seasons, it seems that a lot of people are making the transition to knitting or crocheting with fibers more suited for warm weather; cotton is definitely a popular appropriate spring/summer yarn.  Additionally, with the change of the seasons, there’s usually a change in the types of  projects you work on – maybe you create more dishcloths, or knit/crochet small, portable items to seam together into one large piece later.  I’ve been seeing some beautiful projects online made by crafters such as yourself that I’d love to share.  Take a look at the projects below and maybe you’ll find some inspiration for your next project!

 

Kitchen Cotton Yarn Bombed Chair

Kitchen Cotton Yarn Bombed Chair

Val, over at Val’s Corner was inspired by the bright colors of Kitchen Cotton to yarn bomb her sweet little chair for a fun summery look.  I love her color combinations, and the choice of leaving some of the white wood exposed was perfect; the contrast really allows the colors to pop!

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Glittery Shrug Crochet-Along: Selecting a Size and Working the Lower Half

May 31st, 2012

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Glittery Shrug Crochet-AlongHello everyone! If you’ve been following along with these blog posts in real time, then today is the day that we start our Glittery Shrug! For those of you who are just now joining us, it’s not too late to work up a gauge swatch and jump in! You can also look back at these posts later and follow along at your own pace.

Selecting a Size

When you read through the pattern before you start the garment, you’ll notice that the shrug is made in two pieces, a top half and a bottom half. Since the whole base of the garment is just two pieces, it’s easy to customize. The finished bust measurement is a bit flexible since this isn’t a traditional cardigan. Also, some people will want to wear the shrug closed across the bust, and some will want to wear it open, in which case it can afford to be a little smaller. The first set of numbers in the measurement section is the Finished Circumference for the front opening. This measurement is the edge that comes around your neck, down the front, around your back and back up again. This finished circumference is made up the top (collar) edge on the upper half, and the bottom edge of the lower half.
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Glittery Shrug Crochet-Along: Choosing a Yarn and Gauge Swatching

May 24th, 2012

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VanessaHello fellow yarn crafters! My name is Vanessa, and I will be your host for this Crochet-Along. I am one of the store associates at the Lion Brand Yarn Studio, Lion Brand’s store and education center in NYC.  I have a degree in fashion design, and I have been knitting for fifteen years and crocheting for seven years. The project that we’ll be working on for the next several weeks is the Glittery Shrug pattern done in Vanna’s Glamour yarn. Don’t worry if you haven’t done a gauge swatch yet. Even if you have not yet selected your yarn, this post will help guide you in the right direction, as well as provide you with helpful tips.

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How to Crochet Over Your Ends

May 23rd, 2012

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Tired of weaving in ends whenever you reach a new skein in your crochet project? Avoiding crochet colorwork project because there are too many ends? Try crocheting over your ends! This easy technique allows you to keep on crocheting so that the end you have to weave in is the very last one. Here’s how to do it.

How to Crochet Over Your Ends

You’ll have two pieces of yarn: the working yarn and the tail you’re weaving in (top image). Place the tail over the top of your next stitch (second image). Then, complete your stitch as normal (third image). This securely hides your tail in the middle of the stitch (bottom image). Continue in this manner until the entire tail has been used, then snip any excess yarn that may be sticking out. That’s all there is to it! This technique is helpful for both stripes and solids, so get crocheting!

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Crochet Flower Power: 6 Floral Accessory Patterns

May 22nd, 2012

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Since we’re celebrating May Flowers Month, today, I’ve gathered 6 adorable accessory patterns that are fast to crochet. They’re just right for making multiples and sharing!

Crochet Baby Hat With Flower

Crochet Baby Hat with Flower

Just adorable, this little hat features a gently scalloped edge and is finished off with a little flower. It’s a perfect pattern for those charity projects–check out our Charity Connection if you’re looking for an organization in your area to donate to.

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Announcing Our Summer 2012 Crochet-Along: the Glittery Shrug!

May 17th, 2012

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Each season we host a crochet- or knit-along, a virtual event in which yarncrafters come together here online to work on one pattern together, share their experiences, and to learn together. There’s no need to sign up! Simply follow along with the blog posts at your own pace as you crochet your project, and feel free to share your comments and/or photos as you progress.

The Votes Are In!

Thousands of you voted, and this season, we’ll be making the Glittery Shrug in Vanna’s Glamour. This crochet-along will be hosted by Vanessa, one of our fantastic associates at the Lion Brand Yarn Studio (our retail store & education center in New York City).

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4 Knit and Crochet Garden Flowers!

May 16th, 2012

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As mentioned in Zontee’s post earlier this month, we will be featuring flower patterns for the month of May, and this week, I’m sharing some patterns for flowers you will most likely find in your own garden and at the floral shop.

Knit and crochet flowers are so fun because you can take the traditional form of the flower and mix and match an assortment of colors to create a one-of-a-kind design. Think about all of the different color combinations you could use to create your own special Chrysanthemum (pictured below); use a variegated or self-striping yarn like Amazing, or Sock-Ease, and watch the petals change colors.

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Gauge Swatch 101: How to Make and Measure Your Swatch

May 14th, 2012

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I admit it: I used to cheat at gauge swatches. I would cast on, work a few rows, then assume I was good to go. Of course, my projects never came out the right size (and I have the ill-fitting sweaters to prove it)! Since then, I’ve decided that I prefer sweaters that fit, so now I’m a believer in the gauge swatch. Not only does a swatch help you measure your gauge, but it also gives you the chance to practice your stitches and see how your project will drape. Are you ready to swatch now? Here’s how to make and measure your swatch in 5 easy steps.

How to Gauge Swatch

Step 1: Cast on using the same technique you’ll use for your project. The gauge section of your pattern will tell you how many stitches per inch to anticipate, usually given over 4 inches. To get the most accurate measurements, you’ll want to cast on enough stitches to give you a 5-6 inch swatch. For example, this pattern has a gauge of 16 stitches = 4 inches, so I’m casting on 24 stitches. Work in your pattern for 5-6 inches, then loosely bind off.
Step 2: Measure vertically and horizontally. Don’t cheat by stretching it! It’s okay if your swatch doesn’t lay flat; hold it flat without stretching as you measure. For more accurate measurement, start your counting a few stitches in from the edge (as the size of your edge stitches may be distorted). Note your stitch and row gauge because it’s all about to change!
Step 3: Wash (and dry) your swatch in the same way that you’ll care for your finished piece.
Step 4: Are you going to block your finished piece? If so, block your swatch. Otherwise, skip ahead to Step 5. Click here for more information on blocking.
Step 5: Measure your swatch again. I repeat, don’t cheat by stretching your swatch! This will be your final gauge, which you’ll match against the pattern.

And that’s all it takes to make a gauge swatch! After following these steps, did your gauge change? Mine sure did! I went from 20 stitches over 4 inches (before washing and blocking) to 16 stitches over 4 inches. Likewise, my row gauge went from 38 rows over 4 inches to 32 rows over 4 inches. Does your gauge match your pattern? If not, it’s time to make another swatch. If your swatch is too small (too many stitches per inch), go up a hook/needle size; if your swatch is too big, go down a hook/needle size.

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Choosing the Right Needle or Hook for Your Yarncrafting

May 10th, 2012

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Just as there are many different variations of yarns, there are types of needles and hooks to choose from as well.  Hooks and needles come in different shapes, sizes, and textures to help you achieve your best results when yarncrafting.  They even come in fun colors and designs, allowing you to add a personal touch to your collection of supplies! Imagine your friend handing you a pair of needles in that royal purple color she knows you love so much; you’ll always remember that moment when you work with those needles.

The most common materials you’ll find your needles or hooks in are plastic, wood and metal.  Needle or hook choice is entirely up to you, but it might be beneficial for you to know that the different materials of the needles/hooks can affect the way your knitting or crochet may feel (and sound) as you work.

It’s good to consider having multiple needles and hooks in varying materials, because their properties may have different effects on your gauge. In other words, you may find that you get a slightly different gauge when you knit/crochet with bamboo compared to when you knit/crochet with metal.  Read below for more info on how the different tool materials affect yarncrafting styles.

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