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Archive for the 'Crochet-Along' Category


Mesh Raglan Pullover Crochet-Along: Finished Pullover Round-Up

August 11th, 2011

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I want to thank everyone who participated in the Mesh Raglan Pullover CAL! It’s been a great few weeks, and we hope you’ve had an excellent time crocheting with us. My favorite part of any CAL (or KAL) is seeing all of the fantastic finished objects! Here are a few sweaters from our Ravelry group and our blog.

moxiedox

Jody (Ravelry user moxiedox)used Vanna’s Choice in Seaspray Mist. The subtle print looks great with the mesh style.

Jean

Jean followed along with the CAL here on the blog, making her sweater in the recommended Seagrass Recycled Cotton. I love the flowy fit!

atlantisdragongrl
Cori (AtlantisDragonGrl on Ravelry) made her pullover super cheerful with Sunshine Recycled Cotton.
coolforcats
Robin (Ravelry user coolforcats) made her cool blue top in Marine Recycled Cotton.
mburts

Mburts on Ravelry used the summery Seaspray shade of Lion Cotton. She opted to use the tie around her waist for a flattering silhouette.

Janice

Janice followed the CAL on our blog. She made her looser swing-style pullover with Marine Recycled Cotton.

Thanks for letting me share your wonderful photos, ladies! If you haven’t finished your pullover yet, don’t worry! Our Ravelry group is still active, and all of the blog posts are available for you to peruse at your own pace. Happy crocheting!

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Mesh Raglan Pullover Crochet-Along: Finishing Details

August 4th, 2011

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Welcome back to the Mesh Raglan Pullover CAL and the final step in our sweater crochet-along! Today I’m going to talk about putting the finishing touches on your pullover so you can wear it proudly and show off all of your hard work.

For starters, the pattern indicates to work a trim on the bottom of the body and the neckline using the same (sc, ch 3, dc) as used around the sleeve edges. This cluster is worked in every other ch-1 space, and although it may seem strange to stretch over the skipped space, the height of the double crochet will reach to the next space, resulting in the scalloped edging. If you like the way it looks as is feel free to leave the edging off, but just keep in mind that not only does the edging add a design element, it also gives the finished edge a little more stability, which is particularly nice at the neckline.

Once your edging is complete and your ends are woven in (everyone’s favorite part, I know), it’s time to talk about blocking! Blocking gives your sweater a polished look and gives you the opportunity to shape the sweater into a finished shape. There are many methods for blocking, but for this sweater in particular I chose to pin it in place first and then wet block it with a spray bottle.

Blocking

Although I generally prefer a soaking method for wet blocking, it’s very hot and humid in New York City right now and I was afraid it would never dry! Using a spray bottle to wet the sweater still results in a good blocking, but can dry faster because it has less water saturation. I pinned my sweater in place to the measurements I wanted it to be, stretching it just slightly to open up the mesh pattern, then dampened it with a spray bottle and left it alone to dry.

The final finishing touch is to make the ties! I know I mentioned in an earlier post that I made my neck tie ahead of time for a more accurate idea of how the finished sweater would fit, but now that I’m finishing this garment I’ve decided to re-do my neck tie. While the long chain is perfectly useful, I felt that a slightly more substantial tie would be a nice addition.

To create my ties, I made a chain as long as I wanted for the neck tie, but instead of leaving it as a chain I worked back into it with single crochets (you could also use slip stitches), resulting in a thicker tie. I repeated this for my second tie as well. Some of you have also mentioned using ribbon or a contrasting color of yarn, both of which are great ideas!

Tie placement is another area where you can customize your pullover. The pattern indicates to place a tie at the neckline as well as at the bottom of the body, but you can also take into consideration where you want to shape the body of the sweater. I am placing the first tie at the neckline as instructed because I love the look of the slight gather at the top and how it adds structure to the top of the garment. For my personal style, however, I’m going to use the second tie to create more of an empire waist by weaving it through the stitches of the body below the bust line.

Finished Sweater

The beauty of this sweater is that the body section does not have shaping built in, so you can use the tie to create it wherever you find it works for you. Maybe you’ll want it closer to your natural waist or at the bottom as indicated in the pattern. Better yet, you can change the placement of the tie each time you wear it depending on the look you want. The beauty of a tie creating the shaping is that it can be modified again and again! As you can see, I’m wearing my sweater over a tank top, as many of you have discussed doing as well, but keep in mind that by changing what you use under it you can also change the look each time you wear it. Such a versatile pullover!

Now put on your pullover and admire all of your hard work! Thanks for working through this pullover with me, sharing your experiences, posting your photos, and helping each other along the way. Please continue to share photos of your finished sweaters so we can all share in your pride!

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Mesh Raglan Pullover Crochet-Along: Adding the Sleeves

July 28th, 2011

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Welcome back to the Mesh Raglan Pullover CAL! Hopefully working on the body of your pullover has gone well and you were able to make it the length you want by being able to try it on as you go! Gotta love top-down sweaters, right? This pullover is almost done! Today I’m going to talk to you all about sleeves – then next week it’s on to the finishing touches and this sweater will be complete!

For the sleeves, you are going back to the marked double crochet and chains that you used to create the body only this time you are working the stitches into the armhole opening. As with the body, be sure to read the notes and pay particular attention to whether you should start on the right or wrong side for your size. The other very important note is that you working the first few stitches into the chains you skipped over while making the body. Otherwise working the sleeves around is just like a smaller version of the body, working dc, ch-1 in each dc around.


The chain between the stitch markers has the single sleeve dc between the two dc of the body from before (for the size M with a chain of 3 at the underarms)

A lot of you asked early on about making the sleeves longer. Just as with the body, this is very easy to do! At the simplest, just continue to work more rounds until the sleeves are the length you want, trying it on as you go to see how the fit is coming. As another option, work as above but decrease the number of stitches every 2-3 rounds to shape the sleeve a little smaller as you work towards your elbow.

To work a decrease in this mesh stitch I would recommend working one decrease at the point of the sleeve on the underside of your arm by working your turning chain of 4, then skip the next dc that you would normally work into and instead work your first dc in next dc.


Note the skipped dc below the turning chain. While it does leave a larger hole in the mesh stitch pattern, it is not as noticeable when placed on the underside of the sleeve.

You can also work the decreases at any other point in the sleeve as follows, but keep in mind it will leave a larger space wherever placed:

  1. Work up to where you want to work the decrease.
  2. Work your regular dc, ch-1, only skip the next dc and ch-1 space,
  3. Work the next dc in the following dc, ch-1 and continue in pattern as normal.

What this accomplishes is a decrease of a dc and a ch-1 space without an interruption in the pattern. This will tuck the sleeve in a bit on the underside of the arm and will help the sleeve from staying very open. It’s a great option to decrease slightly even if you don’t lengthen the sleeves as it will help bring the sleeve in a bit if your yoke turned out a little loose. If you choose to decrease, be sure to decrease an even number of times so the edging works out evenly.

Lastly for the sleeve is a trim round where you are working in a completely different pattern than the mesh stitch used so far. Instead you are focusing on working stitches into the ch-1 spaces we have been skipping and not working into the dc stitches at all. Otherwise it’s a nice (sc, ch 3, dc) in every other ch-1 space to make a nice lacy trim.

So get to work on your sleeves and next week it’s all about finishing up this great pullover! Keep sharing your comments and photos of your progress!


Mesh Raglan Pullover Crochet-Along: Underarm Chains

July 21st, 2011

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Welcome back to the Mesh Raglan Pullover CAL! So I spent some time ripping out the yoke and reworking it with the larger H hook and it worked out well – I got the length I needed to reach the armholes. It definitely made the yoke larger overall, but with the neck tie, it still works well, and it gave me a little extra room in the bust and slightly looser sleeves.  Now that I’ve got my yoke in order it’s time to move on to making room for the underarms and working through the body. So let’s get to it!

When you have completed your yoke you finish it off completely by cutting the yarn, then you reconnect the yarn to create chain spaces at the underarms. Before you start, be sure to read all of the notes for the section! Here they are again:

  1. In next section, you are making a ch that spans the underarm and will be used on the Next Rnd of the Body and Sleeves.
  2. Stitch markers are placed at beg and end of the underarm ch to indicate where Sleeve sts will be worked later.

By reading the notes you will get a better understanding of what you are trying to accomplish in the next section, as well as any other bits of information to make the next part a success. This chain gives you some extra stitches to reach from front to back under your arms to work both the body and sleeves off of. Setting up the armholes may sound complicated, but it is just a matter of getting your hook into the right stitches. As written in the pattern:

Join yarn with sl st in last dc of V-st at beg of one Sleeve section, place a marker in same dc as sl st join, ch 1 (3, 5, 7, 9), sk the Sleeve sts, sl st in first dc of V-st at end of same Sleeve section, place a marker in same dc. Fasten off. Rep for other underarm.

So what does this look like? Remember those “corners” we created in the yoke? Focus on two that are on either side of a sleeve section (the shorter of the four sides). Find the V-stitch of the corner to the right of the sleeve (or left of the sleeve if you are left handed). Got it? Now insert your hook into the  leftmost double crochet of the V-stitch (rightmost double crochet if left handed) and join your yarn there. Now create your chain and join back into the rightmost double crochet of the V-stitch (leftmost if left handed) on the other side of the sleeve opening. Joined! It should looks something like this (with stitch markers placed in the same stitches as the joins):

Now to work the body by using those new chains. Here the notes are also super important:

  1. Work next rnd with RS facing for sizes S, L and 2X. Work next rnd with WS facing for sizes M and 1X.
  2. The first rnd of Body is worked over the Back and Front sts and the underarm chs.
  3. The marked dc at beg and end of the underarm chs are part of the Sleeve sts, and are not counted as sts when working the Body.

Although the result it subtle, if you don’t start working as directed in #1 (the right side or wrong side) your stitches in this row will look slightly different than the rest of the rows. How do I know? Because I just started going and noticed after a few stitches that it wasn’t lining up quite like the rest of the rows…then I saw the note about joining from the wrong side if you are making the medium. Make your life easier and check all notes carefully before proceeding! For future reference I marked the right side (RS) of my project with a clip-on stitch marker so I don’t have to analyze it each time I need to know one side from the other:

Stitch marker

This time you will join your yarn and work your ch 4 in the other double crochet of the V-stitch you used for one of your underarm chains. I chose to use the side that would put the join of my rounds on the back of the sweater instead of the front, because the joins always look just slightly different than the rest of the sweater and I’d rather hide that in the back. Once you work across the chain (skipping over both of the marked double crochets at the start and end of each underarm where the chains are attached) and across the body, it should look something like this:

Now you’re set to work round after round around the body, trying it on as you go until you get a length you like. If you are planning to put a tie at the bottom of your pullover as shown in the pattern, make your bottom tie ahead of time (as we did with the neck tie) so when you think you have the length you like, you know what it will look like when done. In case you are having any doubts about joining your rounds each time (maybe adding or losing stitches), the joins are the end of each round should progress something like this (click on each image to zoom):

Ready to go on the next round! Alright, I’m going to keep working through the body of my sweater, trying it on as I go to get the length I want, and next week we’ll be on to the sleeves. Enjoy!

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Mesh Raglan Pullover Crochet-Along: Starting Chain & Raglan Increases

July 14th, 2011

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Welcome back to the Mesh Raglan Pullover CAL! Hope you all had a good week of swatching adventures and have your hooks ready to go – it’s time to get this pullover going! This sweater is worked in the round and as such the traditional start is a long chain which is then joined with a slip stitch in the first chain to create a giant ring. Sounds simple enough, but the tricky thing is to make sure there isn’t a twist in the chain. If the chain is twisted it will always be that way and the top of your sweater won’t work up quite right.

Lucky for us, this pattern gives you another option for starting to eliminate this problem. In this alternative method, you work the first row of the pattern and then join for working in the round. This makes it much simpler because once you have the width of a row established it’s so much easier to see that it’s twist free.

First row
Click here to zoom.

An easier way to do something? Sign me up! To work the beginning this way, follow the instructions: “YOKE: Notes: 1.” listed above the traditional chain instructions. You’ll notice when you follow this method you will end with an extra chain after you work across – this is intentional! As the pattern states, you will later sew the ends of the first row together while weaving in your tails and this remaining ch-1 will become another space in the mesh pattern. Voila!

Yoke

At the end of this set up, just be sure you still remember to place your markers in each of the V-st spaces (4 total) and then proceed to Rnd 2. If you haven’t used markers before they are simply another way to make things easier for you! By putting a stitch marker in each V-st space, you’ll remember that is where you need to do work the following V-st to make the raglan increasing a success.

Markers

Speaking of increases, I just want to clarify how the increases at the four “corners” work. In all of the other stitches around you are skipping over the ch-1 spaces and working double crochet stitches in each dc across. For the increases, however, you work the dc in the dc as per the usual, ch-1, but then instead of skipping over the ch-1 space, that marked space is where you will work your V-st: dc, ch 1, dc. This will be followed by another ch 1, and yet another dc in the dc following the space. This is how the “corners” will look…

Corners

…and this is the result after the yoke increases are completed:

Yoke increases
Yoke increases

As you may have noticed from the photo above I already have the neck-tie in place. This is so I can try it on and know how it is going to fit when finished. As some of you may notice, the neck opening for this top is quite wide. This is because the finished garment has a neck-tie to cinch it to a closer fit, and I want to account for this while I try it on as I go. To do so, jump ahead to the “FINISHING” section, “Neck Tie,” but really it’s just a nice long chain that you then weave through the top of the mesh pattern. Ready to go!

I’m still deciding between two sizes, so I decided to slip the yoke on and see how it’s going for me. Uh oh…my row gauge is causing me some troubles! I didn’t think about the fact that the increases are worked on every round of this pattern, and as such if your row gauge is off, you will reach the correct stitch count, but it may not be long enough to reach to the underarm. Bummer. So now what?

I see two options:

  1. Use a hook that gets me the correct row gauge but wrong stitch gauge just for the yoke then switch hooks for the remainder of the pattern.
  2. Use the hook for your stitch gauge, work extra yoke increases and then account for the extra stitches by working fewer (or no) chains for the underarm and/or do a few increases after the underarm join when first working the body.

The H hook I chose not to use did achieve the correct row gauge, so using the larger hook for the yoke then switching to the G hook for the remainder of the top seems like the right choice in my case. I was debating between 2 sizes anyway, so this will give me a little more room in the bust without added width in the body. Plus if the yoke ends up a little big, the tie is there to tighten up the fit! I’m going to rip back to row 2 and redo the yoke, which is a bummer but that’s why we’re here to support each other by working through this together! It’s only 9 rows and it’s better to get it right. I was once told, “faster isn’t better, it’s just faster,” and I think that’s the perfect way to look at this.

Alright, I’m going to go rip mine back and go again, so get your yoke started and hopefully learn from my attempt. If you have other ideas for how to account for this problem, please comment below! That’s why we have a crochet-along: to learn from each other. Next week we’ll talk about creating the armhole openings and continuing to try on the start of your sweater to be sure you’re getting the fit you want!

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Mesh Raglan Pullover Crochet-Along: Gauge Swatch Time!

July 7th, 2011

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Welcome to the Raglan Mesh Cardigan Crochet-Along (CAL)! As an over-view, here’s what you can expect in the upcoming blog posts, which go up every Thursday:

  • This week: Gauge!
  • 7/14: Starting chain and raglan increases
  • 7/21: Underarms and Body
  • 7/28: Sleeves
  • 8/4: Finishing and blocking – sweater is done!

Some people will work a little ahead of this, and others a little slower, but remember to check the blog each week for help in these different sections (and remember that the blog posts will remain online). Read the comments below and participate in the discussion for even more help. From the many comments in the last week I can tell that you are all as excited as I am to get started on this project, so let’s get to it–onto the the swatch!

As you may know, the intended idea behind doing a gauge swatch is to find out if your working tension is giving you the same gauge as the pattern is written to–this is how you will know if your finished item will turn out to the intended measurements. If your gauge is fewer stitches per inch than the pattern, your gauge is too loose and you need to try another swatch with a smaller hook to tighten it up. If your gauge is more stitches per inch, your gauge is too tight and you need to try a larger hook to make it looser.

But your swatch tells you so much more than that! It is your first chance to try the yarn you have chosen for your project with the pattern stitch and see if you are happy with the resulting fabric. This is especially important when you are substituting yarns. If you have chosen a yarn that is a different fiber than the original, it may not produce the same affect, which can be good or bad. You may also find that although you are able to get the pattern gauge, you may not like how the resulting fabric looks at that gauge and might have to use a different yarn.

Another useful purpose of a swatch is to see how it changes when washed. Wash your swatch according to the care instructions of your yarn to know how it will respond, as some fibers may fluff up or stretch after washing. You may also find the gauge or feel of the fiber changes with washing as well, which I’ll get into shortly.

Now let’s talk about how to swatch. The pattern states that the gauge is 18 stitches and 7 rows is 4″ x 4″ IN PATTERN. This means in the same stitch as the body of the pattern, which in this case is a mesh stitch worked as “dc in next dc, ch 1, skip next ch-1 sp, rep.” I know the V-stitch is highlighted in the notes of the pattern, but it merely used for increasing as we’ll see as we work through the yoke next week.

I always create a swatch that has more stitches than the intended four inches so that I have plenty to measure over. This gives me a more accurate idea of my gauge. In this case I used an H hook and created a chain of 30, worked my first double crochet in the 6th chain from the hook (5 chains skipped = one base chain + three for the turning chain + a chain-1 space), then worked across the chain by skipping 1 ch, dc, ch 1, repeat across. I also work more rows than the intended gauge, so I stopped after 10 rows. Nice big swatch to measure!

Next I washed the swatch because I’m going to want to get the finished sweater wet too for washing and I don’t want any surprises! I soaked it on the sink for 10-15 minutes, gently squeezed out the excess water and laid it out flat to dry. Once it was completely dry, I was ready to measure.

Now how do you measure? Again since our pattern is “dc, ch1″ each of those parts counts as their own stitch. This means I lay out my swatch and place a ruler on it, lining it up with the edge of one stitch then counting each double crochet and chain one across until I have counted 4 inches worth of stitches.

H Hook Swatch

Looks to me like 15.5 sts over 4 inches. Uh oh, too loose :( Time to try again with a smaller hook – a G hook in this case.

G Hook Swatch

This one is just about 18 stitches over 4 inches. Great, G hook it is! I know sometimes it’s hard to know which hook to use, especially if your gauge is a little too tight with one hook and a little too loose with another. Just from personal experience with other garments, I’ve found that it’s much easier to make something bigger with blocking than smaller, and also that crochet fabric is more likely to stretch a little than it is to shrink over time, so unless it’s really tight, I’d suggest the smaller hook.

Editor’s note: Some people may find that their gauge will also change with different types of hooks (metal, wood, plastic), since these provide a different amount of “grip” against different fibers. So if you’re in between hooks, you may want to try a hook of a different material to see if that makes a difference.

I know I’ve focused on stitch gauge, but what about row gauge? Measuring in a similar manner by placing the ruler lined up with the bottom of one row and counting up over 4 inches, I found that I achieved roughly 7 rows over 4 inches with the H hook and 8.5 rows over 4 inches with the G hook, but I need the G hook to achieve the stitch gauge. Bummer!

Luckily with most garments, stitch gauge is much more important to achieve because that gives the width of the sweater, which is much harder to change, but if my garment needs more rows to get the correct length in the end, that’s OK and easy to adjust! Again, we’ll talk pattern modifications in upcoming posts, but if you can only get the stitch OR the row gauge (very common!), go with the hook that gets you the correct stitch gauge.

As an aside, this sweater is made from the top down in one piece which is incredibly helpful because you can try it on as you go! More on that next week as we finally jump into starting the sweater! For now, work on your swatch (or swatches!), and next week I’ll be showing you how to get this sweater going. See you then!

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Announcing Our Summer 2011 Crochet-Along Featuring the Mesh Raglan Pullover

June 30th, 2011

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Each season we host a knit- or crochet-along, a virtual event in which yarncrafters come together here online to work on one pattern together, share their experiences, and to learn together. There’s no need to sign up; simply follow along with the blog posts at your own pace as you crochet your sweater.

We asked you what crochet garment you’d like to make, and you picked our Mesh Raglan Pullover!

My name is Kendra and I’ll be your CAL host! I work at the Lion Brand Yarn Studio, Lion Brand’s unique retail & education center in New York City, where I am both a crochet and knitting instructor and I can’t wait to work through this project with you. Click here to learn more about me. Each week I’ll have a post here about my progress through the sweater full of information I’ve found helpful and hope you will as well. This is meant to be an interactive process so please ask questions here and in our Ravelry group so I–and the other crocheters involved–can help! Click here to join our Ravelry group, and add your photos to our Flickr group here.

CAL BadgeTo start, this week is just about getting your yarn and other materials together. The pattern is made in our Recycled Cotton, which is a fabulous worsted-weight, cotton-acrylic blend that is made from the discarded fabric from tee-shirt production. It comes in beautiful tweed shades and has a great drape making it perfect for a summery top.

Cotton-Ease and Lion Cotton are other great summer yarns, which are both worsted weight and come in a wide variety of colors. Cotton-Ease is another cotton-acrylic blend where the addition of acrylic lends a stretch and drape to the cotton, making it a wonderful choice for garments. Lion Cotton is 100% cotton, which gives it great strength and structure, but it can also make it a little heavy for use in a sweater. Given the open fabric of this top, however, it could also make for a good choice.

As with any yarn substitution, you’ll need to figure out how many balls of your chosen yarn the top will take. The top is written for five sizes, and here are the number of balls for each of our recommended yarns:

Size S M L 1X 2X
Recycled Cotton 3 3 4 4 5
Cotton-Ease 3 3 4 4 5
Lion Cotton (Solids) 3 3 4 4 4
Lion Cotton (Multis) 3 3 4 4 5
Approx. yardage
550 550 750 750 925

Editor’s note: If you’re planning on modifying the pullover in terms of length or planning on keeping your gauge swatch, you may want to purchase an extra ball, just in case.

Now which size should you make? This top is meant to have a slightly loose fit, meaning it has some positive ease, so you want to select a size which measures a little larger than your bust measurement. When in doubt, it’s useful to measure a top you own, whose fit you like, and pick the size closest to that garment’s measurements.

Starting next week I’ll be sharing my progress through the top, starting with the all-important gauge swatch! I’ll also give you an overview of the construction of the garment so you’ll know how it’s going to come together. The following posts will work through the top starting with creating the yoke, moving on to the underarms and body, then the sleeves, and lastly the finishing work and blocking to make your garment perfect! So pick out your yarn, gather your hooks and stitch markers, and check back next week as this CAL really gets going!

Say hello! Leave a comment and tell us who you are, where you’re from, and who you’re making this top for!


Vote for Our Crochet-Along Project!

June 22nd, 2011

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Summer is the perfect time for making a breezy crochet garment. To celebrate, we’re having a crochet-along (a virtual event where we all make the same pattern, with the support of hundreds of other crocheters)! Our friend Kendra, who hosted last year’s Beach Cardi CAL, is back to host. Before we get started, we want you to choose the perfect pattern!
Crochet-along
Clockwise from top left: Persimmon Pullover, Broomstick Lace Crochet Shell, Mesh Raglan Pullover, Light ‘n’ Lively Tank

Click here to cast your vote. We’ll announce the winning pattern on Thursday, June 30th. We can’t wait to get started!

New to our online crochet-alongs? Click here to read our guide to getting started. Remember to check the Lion Brand Notebook on Thursdays for the latest crochet-along posts!


Pearl’s Cardigan CAL Round-Up

November 9th, 2010

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Thank you to everyone who has participated in our Pearl’s Cardigan CAL.  One of the best parts of working with other people on a project is getting inspiration from their finished projects!  Here are a two gorgeous finished projects shared with us on Ravelry.

DinaMarie‘s sweater in Sterling Microspun

cln1105‘s sweater in Lilac Microspun

There are also a few great works in progress that are coming along nicely:

DanaLorz‘s Work In Progress in Ruby Vanna’s Glamour

mmhiscox‘s Work In Progress in Turquoise Microspun

Mudderleigh‘s Work In Progress in Fuschia Microspun

Congratulations to everyone who has finished their cardigan.  Whether you’re finished or still working, make sure to post your pictures to the Pearl’s Cardigan CAL Ravelry group and Flickr group and our Customer Gallery.

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Pearl’s Cardigan Crochet-Along, Part 6: Finishing, Styling, and Care

October 27th, 2010

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I finished my brown, short-sleeved Pearl’s Cardigan! The modifications I added are perfect for my climate (living in southwest Florida) as I have many more opportunities to wear a vest than a long-sleeved sweater. Adding ease in the hips instead of side vents was not necessarily an important modification, but I thought it would be fun to show you two different styles of adding ease in the hips so you can either modify this sweater, or think about this type of modification in future sweater projects. Since I had leftover yarn, I decided to add more length to the body, too. I added an extra 6 repeats of the stitch pattern (for an added 6” of sweater length).

Pearl's Cardigan - Belted

The sleeves are worked even in the round in the same stitch pattern as the body of the sweater. There are lots of options here and since we used the top down method, you can try it on as you go to determine how long you want them to be. If you wanted a sleeve with a wider cuff, you could implement the side vents or increasing I demonstrated for the hip ease a few inches above the end of your sleeve. If you chose to work the sleeve as written in the pattern, you could still customize the length, too. Stop after a couple of inches for short sleeves, just below the elbow for 3/4 sleeves, just before your wrist for a long sleeve. For a cap sleeve (like I chose) only work the edging round onto the last row of the yoke where we separated for fronts, back and sleeves.

Pearl's Cardi - Belted from the back

The edging is very similar to the “pearl” rows of the yoke because it is clusters worked sideways into the side of the previous single crochet. Working them on the exterior edge of the garment gives a pretty scallop and “pearl” texture. I varied the length of the clusters used depending on the area of the sweater: along the fronts I used the treble-crochet-clusters, across the bottom edge I used double-treble-crochet-clusters, and around the neck edge I used double-crochet-clusters.

Pearl's Cardi - edging shot

Do you know how to weave in loose ends? As you added new balls of yarn to your project, you may have been tying knots in the yarn and leaving the ends. It is very, very important that you don’t just cut the yarn close to the knots as they will unravel over time and therefore your sweater will unravel, too. Using a tapestry needle, thread the yarn onto the needle and weave each yarn end into the stitchwork of the sweater. A length of 6” is good for ends because it gives you enough to weave the yarn into the work back and forth a couple of times, with enough left to handle with the needle and your hand. At this point, you will cut the remainder of the yarn end close to the body of work.

Here is a photo of my sweater just before I wove in the loose ends:

Pearl's Cardi Unblocked

Next comes the blocking process. As I have previously stated, blocking is a really important process in garment making. As long as you plan on laundering your project, you will need to know if water changes the gauge. We determined that water did change our gauge, and have assumed that post-wash gauge for the sizing of this garment. There are several ways of blocking a garment.

Steam blocking: If you have an iron with a steam feature, you can easily block your garment on a dress-form or hanger. DO NOT steam the garment on a body. It is extremely hot. The steam immediately relaxes the fabric and adds beautiful drape to your fabric.

Mist blocking: You can use a spray bottle and mist your garment, stretch the fabric to the proper gauge, and let dry. Generally, you should use a blocking board or flat surface that can be pinned for this method. If you don’t have a blocking board, a carpeted floor covered in clean towels and T-pins works fine. Or, a mattress can easily replace a blocking board in the same way (just make sure it isn’t a waterbed mattress!)

Wet blocking: Generally, I use my washing machine for blocking – even with fibers that are not supposed to be washed in the machine – but very carefully. I only use the spin cycle. I place the garment in the washing machine, set it for final rinse and watch it to make sure it does not spin (agitate). Stop the machine so the garment can soak for a few minutes, and turn it back on to spin out the water. When it is complete, you will have a damp garment that can be stretched and blocked with whichever tools you have available.

Depending on where you live and what your temperature and humidity levels are, drying time may vary. If you are feeling rushed, a ceiling fan may speed up the drying time.

Pearl's Cardi - unbelted

Based on the color I chose and the climate I live in, I will most often wear my Pearl’s Cardigan with capri jeans, a brightly colored 3/4 sleeve t-shirt, a brown leather belt and some sparkly jewelry. When I go on business trips, I think the vest will look lovely with a button down shirt, dress pants or a pencil skirt, and my (soon to arrive) silk leopard-print scarf, threaded through the belt loop holes. Too late to alter anything, I realized my brown belt is slightly too large for the belt loop holes so I styled my cardigan with the belt on top of the sweater. I like the way it looks and will probably not search out a belt that specifically fits in the holes. For a dressier look, I think a strapless sheath dress in brown or black would look really pretty with my hair worn up and a contrast color silk scarf for a belt. Let’s say I chose red, I would accessorize it with a red flower in my hair or red lipstick (but not both).

Pearl's Cardi - pinned or buttoned

Note: Unfortunately, I was not able to find a silk leopard scarf in time for this blog post. I finally found one, but it won’t ship to me until next week. I will take new photos then, and add them to this post and the Ravelry pages at that time.

When we buy clothing at the store, laundering is a no-brainer! But with handmade crochet and knit garments, it is a different story. If the yarn is machine washable, I often use the machine on gentle cycle, but otherwise I hand wash all my hand made garments using a delicate soap like Eucalan, Soak or Unicorn Fibrewash. Depending on the garment and the gauge, sometimes you may need to slightly stretch or manipulate your garment back to its original finished measurements.

If you choose to add buttons to the front of your sweater, I don’t think a button hole band is necessary as long as you choose buttons large enough to fit through the openness of the sweater on the opposite side. A shawl pin would work nicely on some occasions, too.

As our Crochet-Along comes to a close, I want to thank everyone who participated along the way. Thank you so much! Without your participation it would not have been the same! The photos on our Ravelry CAL page are gorgeous! Don’t worry if you didn’t finish your sweater in the same time frame as me. The CAL posts will remain here on the Lion Brand Notebook and the CAL group on Ravelry will remain, too. In fact, I will continue to monitor the Ravelry Group for Pearl’s Cardigan CAL, so please continue to share your photos with me!

This Friday, I will be having a Pearl’s Cardigan contest on my website, StyledbyKristin.com, so please stop by. You will need to have a photo of your Pearl’s Cardigan sweater to participate, and a couple of words describing where and when you will be wearing your sweater first. But it doesn’t have to be a finished photo. If you just started, a photo of your hook and yarn would suffice. There will be lots of prizes, including a signed copy of “Crochet So Fine” , “Wrapped In Crochet”, a LionBrand.com gift credit of $25, PDF patterns from my pattern line, coupons and much more. Everyone will be a winner! See you there!

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